Scanning Local Records Tutorial

We have written on this blog several times about scanning government records.  There was a detailed explanation of how to determine whether scanning is an appropriate document management solution.  There have been several overviews of scanning operations for local governments, most recently in response to the question, If our county has a public record on…

ercescosa

10/10 is Electronic Records Day

Today is Electronic Records Day, a day where we raise awareness about the role electronic records play in public business and what the State Archives is doing to help public employees manage and preserve important electronic records. See past Electronic Records Day posts here and here. Many public employees use their personal mobile devices to…

destroy-data

Destruction of Electronic Records

The recently updated North Carolina Administrative Code, as amended and effective June 1st of this year, has two new provisions of interest for records custodians who deal with electronic records.  Kelly Eubank wrote an excellent overview of the changes but I would like to, in this post, explore in more detail how a records custodian may comply with the Code. As you may…

Video Surveillance as Records

The North Carolina Local Government Information Systems Association (NCLGISA) maintains a listserv that I monitor. Recently, a question was posed by a faculty member of the UNC School of Government about video surveillance policies.  The Government Records Section of the State Archives is in the process of updating the General Schedule for State Agency Records; we…

A Tip for the Management of Electronic Files

Copies are the bane of good file management. Paper copies clutter file cabinets. Shared network drives are overpopulated with unnecessary duplicate files — sometimes called “ROT” files, for “redundant, outdated, and trivial.” Sifting through copies, records managers struggle to identify the “official copies” of records that require proper retention and disposition.1 If you have attended one…

Changes in the Administrative Code

Recently, the North Carolina Office of Administrative Hearings updated the Administrative Code for the Division of Archives and Records, part of the Department of Cultural Resources. Because Administrative Code is not updated often, we wanted to point out some of the changes—both little and big. Minor changes: With regards to hours in the Search Room,…